Chronic Conditions Treated With Cannabis. Reported to California doctors between 1990 and 2005 —O’Shaughnessy’s – The Journal of Cannabis in Clinical Practice – Autumn 2005

Chronic Conditions Treated With Cannabis. Reported to California doctors between 1990 and 2005. By Tod Mikuriya, MD - O’SHAUGHNESSY’S – THE JOURNAL OF CANNABIS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE – AUTUMN 2005
Chronic Conditions Treated With Cannabis. Reported to California doctors between 1990 and 2005 — By Tod Mikuriya, MD – O’SHAUGHNESSY’S – THE JOURNAL OF CANNABIS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE – AUTUMN 2005

O’Shaughnessy’s – The Journal of Cannabis in Clinical Practice – Print Edition — About:

«When Tod Mikuriya, MD, founded the group that later became the Society of Cannabis Clinicians, he saw the need for a journal in which doctors monitoring cannabis use by patients could share their findings and observations, and keep abreast of relevant scientific and political developments. Fred Gardner, a former editor of Scientific American who had just finished a stint as public information officer for the District Attorney of San Francisco, launched the paper in 2003. Martin A. Lee has been associate editor since 2009.

Dr. Mikuriya regarded William Brooke O’Shaughnessy, MD, as “a personal hero.”  Dr. O’Shaughnessy was Irish-born and Edinburgh-educated, sent by the British East India Company to Calcutta, where he observed doctors using “gunjah” extracts to treat a wide range of medical problems, including some for which Western medicine had no useful treatments. He studied the relevant literature, conducted animal studies, and tested the effects of cannabis on himself before treating patients with rheumatism, hydrophobia, cholera, tetanus, and epilepsy (“in which a preparation of Hemp was employed with results which seem to me to warrant our anticipating from its more extensive and impartial use no inconsiderable addition to the resources of the physician”).

In 1841 O’Shaughnessy returned to Great Britain carrying his message —and Cannabis indica seeds of the narrow-leaf drug type. Plants of the narrow-leaf hemp type had been widely grown for fiber in Britain, but the narrow-leaf drug type was hitherto unavailable. Its arrival, and the publication in 1843 of O’Shaughnessy’s findings and recipes in the Provincial Medical Journal, enabled chemists to produce potent tinctures for use as doctors and patients saw fit. Western medicine had come to employ cannabis.

In the decades that followed, hemp-based medicines were produced, used, and written about in medical journals with increasing frequency, especially in the U.S.»
(http://www.beyondthc.com/print-edition/)

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